an introduction

You know that awkward point in your interaction with someone when you’ve met a few times, chatted,
{possibly divulged your most embarrassing moment}
yet you have forgotten their name and it’s too late to ask for clarification without being a cad?

OR

Your Soldier takes you to a platoon event and starts talking with his buddy (whom you only know by last name) and his wife,
and your Soldier forgets to introduce you to someone he obviously is long lost BFFs with,
so you awkwardly interject and say,
“Sorry! I’m Megan. And you are?”

I feel like My Soldier in the scenario above in regards to this introduction.
It’s long overdue.
{and honestly you’re missing out by not knowing her}

Meet Betty

Betty is a White 628 Zig-Zag.
Betty White is her formal name.
{if you don’t find humor in her name i’m not offended, but i do smile every time i reference her}
She’s a post-WWII model (since there were almost no sewing machines produced during WWII),
one of the first zig-zag models….
and she’s a beast!
She’ll sew through anything.

Not an ounce of plastic on her.
{which makes her a little heavy on the scale}
But she’s in perfect working condition.
I’ve had her for just over a year and 1/2 and I haven’t had a single problem with her.
{that’s not quite true, the gentleman whom i bought her from smoked like a fish so she sure did reek}

I found her on Craigslist.
This pack-rat of a guy in Ft. Worth was holding on to it.
She was his mother’s and she was the only other owner.
(She had died 20+ years before and it had been collecting dust ever since)
She took awesome care of it!!
Bonus: she had every attachment made (at the time) for my sweet Betty!
{i own a ruffler and if i ever feel the need to ruffle something i have the tool to do so}

This is where she lives in the Book Room.
{in front of my nice white wall complete with nail holes just waiting for some art}

She came with her very own mint condition cabinet.
Once in a very blue moon, I will stop all sewing projects, clean-up the Book Room, and tuck Betty into her cabinet.

Proof that your average 50’s housewife had a general knowledge of such high tech hunks of metal:
it came with not-quite-helpful-enough original owners manual!!

This little black and white beauty talks more about making sure you’re wearing lipstick while sewing (just in case your darling husband drops in from work) than it does about trouble-shooting.
So the few times I had legitimate (user-error) issues, I had to trial and error with it till I got it figured out.
{one time when i fed the bobbin in the wrong direction i was so frustrated that i actually took the manual’s advice and put lipstick on in hopes that it might help me channel my inner-post-war-era housewife and figure it out}

  3 comments for “an introduction

  1. 10.10.2011 at 14:11

    I was looking for more info on the White 628 that we just picked up for $40 (cabinet and all) yesterday. I love this! We had no idea what we were getting when we bought it, we mostly had our eye out for singers. I’ll definitely have to try putting lipstick on if it gives me any trouble 😉

    • Megan
      10.10.2011 at 16:26

      First off, what a steal!! Shoot me an e-mail with any questions you might have and I’ll give you all the info I have found.
      home.front.economics{at}gmail.com

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